Animal welfare: Cameras prove themselves
Animal welfare

Cameras prove themselves

pixabay/3dman_eu
The use of video systems in slaughterhouses has great potential, according to the General Council for Nutrition.
The use of video systems in slaughterhouses has great potential, according to the General Council for Nutrition.

FRANCE, Paris. In France, an experiment on video surveillance in slaughterhouses has been concluded with a positive conclusion.

According to the final report recently published by the General Council for Food, Agriculture and Rural Areas (CGAAER), despite initial skepticism, the trial participants all want to stick with video surveillance. All were satisfied with the system and considered it "useful and practical."

According to the report, however, only five companies took part. The focus was on internal control and monitoring of the animals, for example with regard to the effectiveness of stunning. The recording was limited to killing and bleeding. The use of video systems in slaughterhouses has great potential, according to CGAAER. Among the benefits to companies, in addition to efficiency gains, are the use of recordings for training and meeting customer requirements. Also cited is the ability to counter accusations from animal rights activists with their own recordings. Disadvantages cited include the cost of the systems and data storage challenges.


In its final report, the General Council recommends promoting the widespread use of video monitoring, with a particular focus on covering the costs. In addition, surveillance should be expanded to cover the entire time live animals are present. The experimental introduction of video surveillance in slaughterhouses had been decided as part of the first law to strengthen producers in 2018.

Source: fleischwirtschaft.de; AgE
tags:
France Paris

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