Sustainability Spanish pig sector is fighting climate change

by Editor fleischwirtschaft.com
Sunday, December 08, 2019
Alberto Herranz, director of the Interporc, commented on the sectors progress in a breakfast held during the World Climate Summit (COP25).
Photo: Interporc
Alberto Herranz, director of the Interporc, commented on the sectors progress in a breakfast held during the World Climate Summit (COP25).

Alberto Herranz, director of the Interporc, commented on the sectors progress in a breakfast held during the World Climate Summit (COP25). He pointed out, that pigs only consume 0.05% of the water available in Spain, which has significantly reduced GHG emissions and is progressing in circular economy systems.

"The Spanish pig sector is aware that the planet has a climatic emergency and we must all put solutions together. We are making great progress in the fight against climate change, but we know that we have to redouble our efforts, and we are doing so, in order to continue moving forward together with the rest of the economic and productive sectors,” he commented.

Reduced water use and manure management

Herranz detailed some of the sector's main advances in terms of sustainability, such as the 30% reduction in the use of water per kilo of meat produced. He has indicated that "currently the total water consumed per year by the sector is only 0.05% of the total water available in Spain. And we continue to implement measures and innovate to further reduce what is known as the water footprint".

On the subject of manure, he has clarified that it is not only industrial waste that has to be disposed of, but that it is a high-quality organic fertilizer for use as a fertilizer that reduces the use of chemical fertilizers in agriculture. It also serves as a raw material for the generation of electricity in composting, biogas and cogeneration plants.

Reducing GHG emissions

Regarding Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions, the director of Interporc has clarified that "the weight of the pig sector on national GHG emissions as a whole is only 2%, much lower than public opinion is sometimes led to believe".

He stressed that "Spanish farmers apply techniques to reduce GHG emissions, and thanks to this we have reduced 47% ammonia emissions per kilo of meat produced, 38% nitrous oxide emissions and 14% GHG emissions from manure management.

Likewise, on circular economy he has explained that there are more and more farms that work under the premise Reduce-Reuse-Recycle. To this end, they have separate tanks for recycling the materials and the farmers participate in the process.

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