DMRI Improving food safety

by Editor fleischwirtschaft.com
Wednesday, September 25, 2019
Photo: DMRI

DMRI is launching a new management tool for monitoring the hygiene level in slaughterhouses and on production sites.

The tool offers a systematic review of the hygiene level for overall improvement and thereby control of unwanted bacteria. From time to time bacteria e.g. Salmonella, Listeria and E. coli are a problem in the food industry because these bacteria can cause illness to the consumer.

“The international meat industry has become more aware of these problems and is looking for solutions to improve the hygiene level. By introducing the food safety management tool, we offer the industry a well-documented solution that can help maintain focus on production hygiene, cleaning processes and the handling of carcasses that are critical areas of contamination,” says Claus Hindborg Christensen, Project Manager, Food Safety, DMRI.

The systematic approach of the tool can be used in slaughterhouses, meat production sites and food production plants in general. It is based on verified checklists that help slaughterhouses and production sites identify critical areas and subsequent implement continued and systematic monitoring of the hygiene level.

The ongoing focus on hygiene is key to control unwanted bacteria. Although, procedures have been written down and are known to the employees they are not always followed.

The food safety management tool is developed based on many years of experience supporting the Nordic meat industry. Today, the Danish pork industry is one of the largest exporters in the world and is recognized for the high level of food safety. 

“In Denmark, we have worked continuously with improving hygiene levels for many years and therefore, we know how bacteria travel around in a production plant. We have found, that production hygiene and the following cleaning process are the two key factors that have a critical effect on hygiene, shelf life and food safety, and this also apply to the food industry globally,” says Claus Hindborg Christensen. 

 

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