Pathogen testing market grows 18%

by Editor fleischwirtschaft.com
Friday, August 26, 2011
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Testing for microbial contamination by the U.S. food industry is on the rise. In 2010, 213.2 Mio. microbiology tests were collected in the U.S. food processing industry - a 14.4% increase since 2008.

In its newest market research report, "Food Micro, Fifth Edition: Microbiology Testing in the U.S. Food Industry," Strategic Consulting tracks changes to microbiology testing practices in the U.S. food industry as it strives to produce safe, shelf-stable foods in an increasingly global market.

Thomas Weschler, president and report author, says that although the food safety testing market has shown solid growth in the last decade, recent concerns about contaminants such as E. coli 0157 and Salmonella have driven 18% average growth in the testing market since 2008.

After a decade of solid growth, the microbiology testing requirements of the food processing industry have been thrust into the public spotlight again, driving robust growth in food diagnostic testing, Weschler explains. Overall market value growth has averaged 13% over the past three years, and pathogen testing market value growth has averaged 18% during the same time.

This latest report examines the markets, methods, technologies and key companies involved in microbiology testing in the food processing industry. The report is based on Strategic Consulting's primary research with more than 100 food processing plants in the meat, dairy, fruit/vegetable and processed food segments. The firm also contacted many of the senior quality and food safety officers at the top-30 food companies to include both strategic and operational perspectives on microbial testing in the U.S. food processing industry.

The volume of routine/indicator tests went up by slightly more than 10% between 2008 and 2010. During that same three-year period, however, the volume of tests that look for specific pathogens such as Salmonella, Listeria, Campylobacter and E. coli O157 increased by more than 30%.
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