Genetic marker might help to control PRRS

by Editor fleischwirtschaft.com
Wednesday, March 21, 2012

fleischwirschaft.com - USA, New York. A research uncovers a genetic marker that
could help to control and  eliminate the PRRS (porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome) virus. A collaborative discovery involving Kansas State University researchers may improve animal health and save the U.S. pork industry millions of dollars each year.

Raymond Rowland, a virologist and professor of diagnostic medicine and pathobiology, was part of the collaborative effort that discovered a genetic marker that identifies pigs with reduced
susceptibility to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome, or PRRS. This virus costs the U.S. pork industry more than $600 million each year.

Rowland stated that this discovery was the first of its kind for PRRS but also for any large food animal infectious disease.

Rowland and researchers Jack Dekkers from Iowa State University and Joan Lunney from the Agricultural Research Service discovered a genetic marker called a quantitative trait locus, or QTL, which is associated with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus susceptibility. This discovery is a first step in controlling and eliminating the virus.

The research recently appeared in the Journal of Animal Science. The project's beginning and future center around Kansas State University, Rowland said.

It begins at the university because Rowland is involved with an organization called the PRRS Host Genetics Consortium, or PHGC, which initiated and provided more than $5 million for the research. Rowland is co-director of the consortium, which is a collaboration among the
United States Department of Agriculture, the National Pork Board and Genome Canada as well
as universities and industry members. Rowland is also director of the USDA-funded PRRS Coordinated Agriculture Project, known as PRRS CAP.

The researchers obtain multiple measurements - including growth, weight gain, performance and virus measurements - over time. They have collected samples from more than 2000 pigs
since they began the study in 2007, for a total of more than 100,000 samples that are stored or distributed to the consortium's collaborators.

The university shipped samples to the Agricultural Research Service for genomic DNA preparations to identify differences among more than 60,000 genes. The data was transferred to Iowa State University for genetic analysis that led to the discovery of the QTL.

The collaborators at Iowa State University created a common database so that all the data collected during the project can be accessed at multiple locations by researchers and the breeding industry for the next several decades.

They were not only making healthier animals, but they were also understanding the fundamental biological relationship between a host and a pathogen, Rowland said.

Other Kansas State University collaborators involved include the Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory and Carol Wyatt, associate professor of diagnostic medicine and pathobiology.
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