Filleting robot to help the Norwegian fishing industry

by Editor fleischwirtschaft.com
Monday, February 03, 2014
Photo: w.r. wagner / pixelio.de

A newly developed white fish filleting machine could give the Norwegian fish industry a much-needed boost, according to Sintef, an independent research organisation.

The new machine locates the fish bones using X-ray technology, and fillets the fish quickly and precisely with a powerful jet of water. Unlike farmed salmon, white fish varies greatly in size and weight. This means that until now, no one has been able to develop a machine that can fillet these fish.

However, there is now a machine that could result in a positive upturn in the Norwegian fishing industry. The machine is a result of a development project run by Nordic Innovation, in which Sintef, Marel, Faroe Origin and Norway Seafoods have been working together.

White fish is complicated and time-consuming to fillet, because the bones are difficult to find and remove. As a result, 3–7% of the most valuable part of the fish is currently cut away unnecessarily. Researchers at Sintef ICT have conducted X-ray tests in the laboratory, and have used CP scanners at Oslo University Hospital to learn more about where fish bones are located.

The technology focuses on image analysis and recognition. The new machine locates the fish bones using X-ray technology, and fillets the fish quickly and precisely with a powerful jet of water. This means that the fish is guaranteed to be boneless, with considerably less wastage than with manual filleting.
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