Antimicrobial resistance remains commonly detected

by Editor fleischwirtschaft.com
Friday, April 04, 2014
Photo: Martin Gapa / pixelio.de

Bacteria most frequently causing food-borne infections, such as Salmonella and Campylobacter, show significant resistance to common antimicrobials, according to the EFSA-ECDC European Union Summary Report on antimicrobial resistance in zoonotic and indicator bacteria from humans, animals and food in 2012.

Data show that combined resistance (co-resistance) to critically important antimicrobials remains low. While this means that treatment options for serious infections with these zoonotic bacteria are available in most cases, the fact that antimicrobial resistance was commonly detected is cause for concern.

The joint report shows that clinical resistance in humans to commonly used antimicrobials in Salmonella spp. isolates was frequently detected at the EU level, with almost half of the isolates being resistant to at least one antimicrobial, and 28.9% of isolates being multidrug-resistant. However, levels of clinical resistance and co-resistance in Salmonella spp. isolates to critically important antimicrobials were low (0.2% co-resistance across the 12 Member States that submitted data).

Microbiological resistance in animals to commonly used antimicrobials in Salmonella spp. isolates was frequently detected in the animal species monitored, especially in broilers, pigs and turkeys. Microbiological resistance to ciprofloxacin (a critically important antimicrobial), was frequently observed in broilers and turkeys. Co-resistance to the critically important antimicrobials, ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime, was either not detected or reported at very low levels in reporting Member States.

In Campylobacter spp. isolates from human cases, clinical resistance to common antimicrobials was frequently detected. Very high proportions of isolates (47.4% EU average) were resistant to the critically important antimicrobial ciprofloxacin with increasing trends observed in several Member States.

Microbiological resistance to commonly used antimicrobials in Campylobacter spp. isolates was frequently detected in broilers. Co-resistance to critically important antimicrobials, ciprofloxacin and erythromycin, in C. jejuni in broilers was either not detected or reported at low levels.

Microbiological resistance to commonly used antimicrobials in E. coli isolates was frequently reported in broilers and pigs. Co-resistance to critically important antimicrobials in these animal species was mostly not detected or recorded at very low levels among the reporting Member States.
stats